In Memoriam: Pioneer Joyce Kirton recalls an awakening to dance (October 9, 2016)

Dance pioneer Joyce Kirton died today, March 26, 2020. This is an article I wrote following her appearance at the Monday Night Theatre Forum in 2016. It was published in the Trinidad Guardian on October 9, 2016, but wasn’t released on my website until today. RIP Ms. Kirton!

Dance pioneer, choreographer and teacher Joyce Kirton began her Arts career at age 19 when she entered Government Teachers College in 1951. She told the Monday Night Theatre Forum that she had always been interested in what happened on a stage as well as in film and musicals.

The principal at GTC when she entered was an Englishman, Luther Kenworthy, who introduced the students to classical music and theatre and his wife Gwyneth taught dance, physical education and games.
“That gave a side of myself I didn’t know I had. I didn’t know I could create movement, I thought it was something you had to be taught. I don’t know if our children and even our teachers feel that kind of experience, that kind of awakening in yourself when you discover that you are a creative. She produced in me the kind of dance that changes you as a person. It was not the performing of the dance, but the way the dance made you feel as a person.”
After the Kenworthys left, Sydney Hill from the British Council taught drama and Beryl McBurnie taught dance, although she annoyed the students at first by talking too much. “It dawned on us that this was another kind of education. She taught us to look at Trinidad and see the heritage we had as a people, and so we began to discover that there are different kinds of dance.”
After leaving school, Kirton joined the St. Paul’s Choir and the San Fernando Lady’s Choir, before moving on to the Carnegie Players, where she did plays like Dark of the Moon, Misbegotten and Christopher Fry’s ‘The Firstborn’ with 14-year-old Patrick Manning. She became a founding member of the Arawaks Dance Group in 1955, after the St. Paul’s Parish priest asked Beryl McBurnie to form a group. Here she met Albert Laveau, who she said was the bright dramatic light of the group before being enticed away to Port of Spain. “That is a process that has repeated itself over the years, your talent blossoms in San Fernando, then it becomes national and people in the North want you to forget where you came from.”
Kirton then went abroad to study physical education at Chelsea College in Sussex, as this was the only way she could get to do dance. “I began to learn a lot more about choreography. That gave me my Laburn base – Laburn is a thinker or researcher whose work has influenced dance in education ever since World War Two. You analyzed how your body moved and all the things that made movement and we were encouraged to be creative within those boundaries.”
She then returned to San Fernando and began teaching at Anstey Memorial Girls’ Anglican School, where she started Les Enfants Dance Company after the children she was teaching asked to form a dance group. The name Les Enfants was chosen because she constantly referred to them as “the children.”
The group was invited to perform publicly for the first time in 1962 at an Independence concert in the newly opened Naparima Bowl. Following this, Les Enfants performed for different charitable organizations, as well as having fundraisers to support itself. Kirton said the group became a family, so it hurt when Port of Spain dance groups would lure away her dancers, particularly the boys.
An important part of Les Enfants, Kirton said, was the research they did. One such project was into the saraca dance, which was a number of African nation dances put together. She said this dance came to T&T from Carricou and Grenada where it began. In 1973, the group went to places like Quarry Village, Marac and Couva to research the dance, as well as Pembroke in Tobago to research the Congo Nation dance. They used this research to create a production called Roots, which came about mainly through the work of four male dancers: Wilfred Mark, Ridge Rodney, Dennis Noel and Leonard Jack. The production toured all over Trinidad and in Guyana.
Several Les Enfants alumni have gone on to be successful in dance and other creative areas, in both T&T and internationally. However, the company itself has reverted to being for children under 12 and is run by Ursuline Williams. Kirton also said there is some Arts activity in the South as well, though it does not receive much publicity.
Kirton again went abroad to study in her late 30s, obtaining a Bachelor of Education from Sussex University. She was amazed to see the wider variety of dance in schools, ranging from aerobics with music to theatrical/contemporary to very targeted towards children and teenagers. She said the choreographic program was taken very seriously but there was a greater focus on theatre and teaching practice, rather than dancing in the studio.
Kirton said these two experiences informed her teaching of dance and her creative process, which was partially instinctive and partially taught. She said she was also influenced by her experience in drama, especially with regards to how people looked on stage.
There are three projects that Kirton would like to see happen: the establishment of a small theatre in San Fernando for some of the smaller groups to be able to put on performances; a homework centre for young people where they can get help if they are struggling with subjects, learn life skills and the arts and play games; and “a secondary school in San Fernando that will cater for all the black children who get good marks in Common Entrance who can’t get into the best schools.”
“I think we can do so much more for our children in schools, but successive governments have not gotten the dance message. If children had dance experiences, they would be more comfortable in their own skin, be more self-aware with a sense of self-worth and self-control. We’re losing what dance can do for the person, the dancer. We teach dance not necessarily to make dancers, but to make better people.”

Unedited notes below

I think we can do so much more for our children in schools; but succeeding governments have not got the dance message, they just don’t get it; we have a teachers college that’s not putting out dance teachers, we should have institutions of training, like the Edna Manly College for the Arts in Jamaica

*38 because if children had dance experiences, they didn’t have to turn out to be dancers, they would be more comfortable in their own skin, they would be more self-aware, they would feel a sense of self-worth, they wouldn’t sell themselves so cheaply, the young men would know a lot more about self-control, that you don’t need to solve problems with violence, and we’re losing what dance can do for the person, the dancer. We teach dance not necessarily to make dancers, but to make better people, and you can’t get the Ministry to buy that and I’ve never been a good salesman

I think now that, I’m not sure that dance plays an important part in young people’s lives, I’m very sad about what’s happening to our young black people, the men seem to have a thirst for blood, and you can’t get the young girls to understand that they would do well to cross their legs for a year or two before they embark on having children. I look at the young people and I’m so sad, they don’t care about anything, you talk to them and you know they’re not listening

quite a number of my graduates are into dance, and all are into something worthwhile; they are good people, confident, sure of themselves, I’m proud of them; I claim that as my legacy

*44 people are important, people help you, they have a great influence on you, they have a lot to teach you

4:11 I have always been interested by what happens on a stage; one year at about 16, saw both Beryl McBurnie and Geoffrey Holder, never thought would have those experiences like those I saw on stage, was also interested in film and musicals, people in my genre were influenced by what we saw on screen

5 went to Government Teacher’s College at age 19 , my life in the Arts began at that time. Those of us who are left from those who entered in 1951, we think we were fortunate to get into Teacher’s College at that time, because the principal, an Englishman called Luther Kenworthy, was , “appalled at our backwardness”, was brave, so much so he antagonized the hierarchy of the education department at that time and didn’t last much longer, two or three years, old French-Creole colonials, the director did not like Luther Kenworthy, students loved him

6:50 he played classical music every lunchtime, he started a choir, couldn’t sing but joined the choir, sang everything, had the choir March around the gallery of the college to get the spirit of Hallelujah Chorus, he was a very unusual man; wife was also appalled that we didn’t teach anything like Physical Education or Games at the college, undertook to teach Physical Education and Dance free of charge, with Gwyneth Kenworthy learned netball, tennis and above all, I learned to dance

*8 that gave a side of myself I didn’t know I had; didn’t know I could create movement and to me that’s something that you had to be taught, she did what was called modern educational dance, she put on music and gave us any stimulus she could think of, and we had to create our own movements and I went to town on it, don’t know if our children and even our teachers feel that kind of experience, that kind of awakening in yourself when you discover that you are a creative and to me it’s a big thing, so she produced in me one layer, one side of my life in dance, that is the teaching side, the educational side, the kind of dance that changes you as a person, it’s still a very difficult concept for some teachers to understand, I don’t know that we’re there yet, it was not the performing of the dance, but the way the dance made you feel as a person.

10 At end of first year at GTC, Kenworthys went back to England and GTC became a dry and forlorn place; brought Beryl McBurnie who annoyed us by talking too much and we wanted to move, not used to sitting and listening, dawned on some of us that this was another kind of education; she taught us to look around and see what we had as a people; Beryl taught us to look at Trinidad, to understand the heritage that we had, and so we began to discover that there are other kinds of dance – Mrs. Kenworthy did a lot of English and European folk dance, and creative dance ; when you could get Beryl to teach us to move, we did a different kind of thing, the folk, the Beles, etc., but she mostly talked, but it was a connection that in later years became very important to me.

12 Another GTC experience was Sydney Hill from British Council, did drama with us; so I was exposed to choral music, dance and drama at GTC; left GTC in 1953, went back to San Fernando, didn’t know what to do with myself, ; joined St. Paul’s Choir in San Fernando, which was my church, felt a little embarrassed because I didn’t think I could sing well enough, very good choir in those days and then became brave enough to join the San Fernando Lady’s Choir, which later became Southernaires, heard about Carnegie Players somewhere and found myself there

13 Found self in Carnegie Players, which was an interesting place; at the time was into choral music and drama, felt fulfilled with the drama, thing about Carnegie Players was that you were acting, directing, stage managing, did everything, enjoyed the theatre

14 thing about my story is the people I met that were influential – because in St. Paul’s Choir, there was Canon Farquhar, the parish priest, who was a friend of Beryl, asked her to form a dance group in San Fernando, ran a three month course, had to pay for it, had tremendous response from word of mouth, I was the secretary of the first group, 85 young people came to join the Arawaks, 1953, lots left when it wasn’t what they thought it was or couldn’t handle it, Beryl was very sarcastic, called the Arawaks

17 Albert Laveau was the bright dramatic light before people in POS enticed him up here, a lot of people felt he came of age up here but he was our star for about 10 years before he went there, and some of us felt a bit peeved that San Fernando was not recognized

18 Kelvin Rotardier – died this year, 2016, his journey in dance had a chapter in San Fernando, he danced with group in Port of Spain, was transferred by his company to work in San Fernando, somebody told him about Arawaks, Beryl had just finished her three-month thing and we were the blind leading the blind, didn’t know what to do with ourselves, he came and brought us back together, would have been no Arawaks if Kelvin hadn’t given us his experience and expertise, eventually Beryl saw him and took him to be lead dancer of the Little Carib; that is a process that has repeated itself over the years, your talent blossoms in San Fernando, it becomes national, people in the North want you to forget where you came from

20 to give Beryl her due, got Kelvin a scholarship to England where he was discovered by Alvin Ailey, so she helped him with his journey, but we remember Kelvin with a lot of affection

21 danced with Arawaks and everything I learned there, I taught my children at Anstey Memorial, so my journey of the dance was always on one side I’m learning, on the other side I’m teaching, so really have two stories: my dance in education and my theatre dance story, which I always try to keep very apart

21 In early days, began to put on too much weight I thought and did not like the image I had of myself and took myself off the stage very quickly so my performing life was very short, began to teach and discovered I really enjoyed it

*22 I worked at Anstey Memorial Girls Anglican School where Les Enfants Dance Company began with about 16 to 18 children; we did many different kinds of dance, European, local dance, creative things, made-up things, we did every kind of thing you could imagine

22 1962, most were going to secondary school; I was really sad, they asked to form a company, parents said yes as long as they didn’t have to buy costumes and it didn’t interfere with their schoolwork, found a name, called Les Enfants Dance Company because she always referred to them as “the children”, some thought it was a temporary name but it never changed

23 1962 was Independence; San Fernando Borough council gave concert in Naparima Bowl, which was opened that year; were invited to perform in public for the first time, had entered Dance Festivals before but this was a grown-up concert, so were excited but had no money or costume; the then Mayor, Leslie Edmonds gave us $100, which bought two sets of costumes for 20 girls; did a piece called Calypso Can-can; first time children heard their music amplified, they got so excited and danced their hearts out. That was the start of the company, we performed for tea parties, charitable organizations, Coterie of Social Workers, YWCA, all the charitable people in San Fernando would call us, I would tell them just feed the children, because they liked to eat; we had camps, walkathons, cake sales, Christmas parties

*26 and without planning it or meaning to, a family group emerged, you knew everybody, their parents, what made them tick, etc.; Les Enfants became much more than a dance company and played it that way until we began to grow up and do more challenging things and have shows and the country began to notice us; the Port of Spain groups, I found my boys disappearing and it really hurt.

*27 One of the people who took a lot of boys from me was Astor Johnson, boys would keep calling her and she wondered why they didn’t call him, and he gave her a lecture, “why are you pushing them away, you should be so pleased that he still wants to keep contact with you,” Astor and I came to terms with Astor taking some of the boys, it was very hard to take at first, and I remember my aunt asking”why do you want to hold on to them? They are humans, they are flesh and blood, they have lives to live, let them go, let them fly”

*29 letting go was great because now in my declining years I have a family of children that don’t forget me, they come to see me, they’re beautiful and I’m very proud of them

30 part of the perks of having a company was the research we did, one of our very important projects was the Saraca experience, I discovered this African festival and I was very attracted to it because to my mind it was Caribbean, it was African but it was Caribbean-African: you wouldn’t go to any part of Africa and see a saraca, because what a saraca is, is a number of nation dances put together, and this did not begin in Trinidad, it began in Carricou and Grenada, came over with Grenadian immigrants, so that then you would find patches of the Saraca in Quarry Village in the south or Marac in Moruga or in the back of Couva, all those are places that we researched the Saraca in 1973,

31 also went to Tobago to research Congo Nation dance in Pembroke; that was another joke because the people in Tobago always wanted to come and tief their ting” so we were not really allowed to see them do it but one of the gentlemen felt very embarrassed and gave us a song which we used to produce Roots

*32 Roots was the production in which we highlighted the Saraca dance and it came about because of four very remarkable young men – Wilfred Mark – he liked to choreograph and had a feel for the folk, Ridge Rodney -natural musicians, made up our songs, also creative with his hands and made our costumes, Dennis Noel who wrote the script, we put the Saraca in a little story and produced our first folk ballet, it’s the form the Best Village uses where you act, you sing, you dance etc and that was very fulfilling, Leonard Jack – very good dancer, very rhythmic -one of the few people I know who he created drum rhythms, you could ask him to create a rhythm for you and you would do it. He’s produced quite a lot of music in a small but significant way after putting himself through the University of Washington

34 Roots revolved around the four boys, who choreographed, led the dances, wrote the script, created the music, everything – took production to Guyana, our first tour, as well as all over Trinidad, at UWI St. Augustine, Hilton, POS, the Staff Club in Fyzabad; we had a good time with Roots and it’s a very important part of the history of Les Enfants

*35 I think now that, I’m not sure that dance plays an important part in young people’s lives, I’m very sad about what’s happening to our young black people, the men seem to have a thirst for blood, and you can’t get the young girls to understand that they would do well to cross their legs for a year or two before they embark on having children. I look at the young people and I’m so sad, they don’t care about anything, you talk to them and you know they’re not listening

*36 on the education side I was very lucky to meet some nice people here and abroad, and had the benefit of two stints in English colleges; I think we can do so much more for our children in schools; but succeeding governments have not got the dance message, they just don’t get it; we have a teachers college that’s not putting out dance teachers, we should have institutions of training, like the Edna Manly College for the Arts in Jamaica

*38 because if children had dance experiences, they didn’t have to turn out to be dancers, they would be more comfortable in their own skin, they would be more self-aware, they would feel a sense of self-worth, they wouldn’t sell themselves so cheaply, the young men would know a lot more about self-control, that you don’t need to solve problems with violence, and we’re losing what dance can do for the person, the dancer. We teach dance not necessarily to make dancers, but to make better people, and you can’t get the Ministry to buy that and I’ve never been a good salesman

39 Carlton Gittens – average dancer, went to Canada, danced for a little while in Toronto, found himself interested in handicraft and leather work, came down one year and had a booth in the Savannah, it was fabulous, did creative things with metal and leather and brass

41 he said she taught him to be creative, so he could not have been doing this if he hadn’t danced with her; I never saw what we did as having applications in other areas of the Arts, but apparently it could and does

41 people who have danced with me have gone on to do lots of things, a lot are teaching, used to have three people in Norway, Antonio Ferraz, Richard Lessy and Arlene Wilkes but only Tony and Richard are left now,

Arlene -has come back to Trinidad, has her own studio in San Fernando, very into jazz, quite a good choreographer, the Alpha Dance, Beverly Otwa-McLean Sharon Pierre – Elements in Fyzabad, Wilfred Mark teaches dance in prisons in San Francisco and Oakland and around there, live in fear of him being attacked by the people he’s teaching ; Bacari in Toronto with Coba, Karen Lyons – Florida

44 quite a number of my graduates are into dance, and all are into something worthwhile; they are good people, confident, sure of themselves, I’m proud of them; I claim that as my legacy

*44 people are important, people help you, they have a great influence on you, they have a lot to teach you

45 not sure if it’s a company anymore, first of all, I’ve become very afraid of teenagers – join group, don’t want to pay fees, dance with you and then everybody else, take costumes and don’t return them. Have now a group of children, so back the way we started, mostly under 12 kids, primary school kids, run by a young woman Ursuline Williams who danced with Arawaks, never Les Enfants, foundation Morne Diablo person, she runs it for me, I go now and again; we won’t be able to have a show in the foreseeable future, don’t have enough, have stuff socially, just came out of two days of camp where they met children from other camps and socialized and were taught and learned different things like costume-building and wirebending, etc. It’s a different company to what we used to do long ago

48 – there is Arts activity in South but we’ve lost the energy we used to have, Arawaks is still limping along under Torrance Mohammed, not sure when last they had a show, Elements from Fyzabad, they recently had a tea-party and dance and whatever 48:44

*49 There’s a young woman called Sherma Burke, she does very good work, I haven’t gone to any of her shows but she had one about two years ago that I heard was extremely good, she is functioning; another group of children called Little Feet, they are going along; there are schools like Eugene Joseph and one or two other people, but the kind of energy we had long ago, with the San Fernando Festival and you’re seeing all these groups on stage, we had four leading dance companies in the San Fernando Arts Council, we don’t have that energy again

50 there’s another Best Village teacher, Lauren Eligon, she has a group, Terry David has a very good group that works out of Lion’s Club and Terry also does the choreography for a Belmont group that has been touring all over the place, and in Princes Town for many year, Eujamma Arburton? It was a dance drumming group, but they did mostly West African work. There is a lot of activity but it’s very underground

51 what we need in San Fernando is a small theatre as these small groups may not be able to fill Naparima Bowl or SAPA, so they can put on performances, even Naparima Bowl which seats 400 might be too big for some of them, so smaller than Naparima Bowl

*52 children now are not as, I think it’s their parents, when we first started, parents sent their children to dance and they came and they were happy to come, and came regularly – parents now bring children to dance, because times are very dangerous and sometimes parents say they wanted to sleep in the Saturday morning and didn’t feel like getting up, so there are a number of things that affect the working of groups now that didn’t seem to matter then

54 – I started with Gwyneth Kenworthy at Teacher’s College, Beryl had a little hand, her influence on Arawaks was really focused on those three months, and then she more or less weaned us and we did our own thing, after that, it was a trial and error thing in Arawaks, all of us had a hand in choreography, but it worked sometimes and didn’t work at other times, but my process as a choreographer was really influenced by my work in Education; because at first course I did abroad was a Physical Education course because that was the only way I could get get to get to do dance, by going to get trained as a PE teacher, so had to do tennis, dance and gymnastics and the whole kit and caboodle, and the dance at Chelsea College was creative and that began a whole, I began to learn a lot more about choreography, that gave me my Laburn base which, Laburn is a thinker or researcher whose work has influenced dance in education ever since World War Two. So my first trip to England started that kind of creative thing,

55 – then I came home, did a dance practice, started Les Enfants and all that, then did a second course in late 30s, and that further enriched the process, so my creative process was not overnight, it developed, a lot of it was instinctive, but a lot of it was learned, I think too my drama influenced my choreography

*56 I was always very careful about the way people looked on stage, work in Education enriched what I did on stage, I go to concerts sometimes and I see people, to me the stage looks untidy, I want to see, if you’re standing there, why are you there and how are you relating to the person who’s over there, that kind of thing so so so I think so I think the soithinkthedrama influenced it, but I think my work in education more or less enriched what I did on stage,

*56 what I would like to see happen now with the folk, is that we create dances that tell a story, but that are not necessarily a bongo or a Bele or a or a pique or whatever, it’s just a dance about us, and you recognize the folk style of the dance4s, they could never be anything else but Trinidad dancers by the way they move, and they’re telling stories about now, how we live, what we are, how we relate to each other, how do we handle the man woman situation, how do we handle neighbors, communities, leadership, we tell our stories with our music and with a dance style that belongs to us, I really am a little paranoid about people wanting to push technuque that belongs to North America or to Europe or England down my throat and saying I need to teach my dancers this technique or that technique, I just want them to create and to move

*58 – of course we are to make sure that they use body in an attractive way, because in as much as I talk about technique, ugly feet offend me, but j think weve gone too much on that side where we put on a piece of music that says nothing and we just create a piece in which bodies move and we’re creating images but by the time you get home, you forget them, producing totally forgettable stuff, and to me that is the test of a dance, do you remember it years later?

59 – question -difference between education and theatre dance, and they can make a difference in the lives of children

1:00 the first time I went, the college and the dance were very Laburn-focused – you analyzed how your body moved and all the things that made movement, we were encouraged to be creative within those boundaries. The second time I went back I was amazed that in the 10 years I had been to the country, dance in schools had become very free and had a greater variety, you had teachers who would tell you that the children don’t like dance so they’re doing aerobics to music, as far out of step as that, then had others who were very theatrical, very contemporary, the dancing they produced in the classroom could find its way on the stage easily or somebody who was really interested in reaching the child/teenager

1:02 – the second time I found a whole range of movement, even in the way class was conducted – in the first course, had normal warmup where encouraged to move about theroom and do your own thing, the second program the dance teacher had a set warmup that she did that was like a dance company’s warmup, so there was a whole wide range of ways to teach; found however that choreography was a big thing, we were encouraged to choreograph, the choreographic part of the program was taken very seriously; we were told months in advance what the examination would be like, so had time to choose our music, subject, decide what we’re going to do, and tutorials for evaluation; the focus in the second program was on choreography, on the history of dance; on theatre in some respects and a lot of work in the schools, had a lot of teaching practice and choreography, less on dancing in studio

1:05 – I tried to see every concert that was going

1:06 – I did some extra courses in drama; saw as much theatre as I could, in Eastbourne where I studied, had Eastbourne Congress Theatre; didn’t do as much theatre as I would have liked in the program itself, because everything was so packed, so much to do in so little time, what I did was really rewarding form me

1:07 at Carnegie Players, did plays like Dark of the Moon, Misbegotten, Christopher Fry’s ‘The Firstborn’ with 14 year old Patrick Manning, who just had to play dead

1:08 Douglas Archibald – did some of his plays; one play that gave trouble, Carnegie Players

1:09 – working on three projects right now that I really wish I could complete, one – missed my chance to get a property that Les Enfants could call home, there’s no way we could do it now, to me I didn’t think of it in the days we would have been able to do it, we never had a home of our own and that leads to me to the dream I have now of acquiring a small theatre in San Fernando where you could do a lot of work in, maybe 50 to 100 people

1:11 would also have liked a homework Centre for young people, with a difference, don’t want it to look like school but have teachers to help with difficult subjects/problems, also teaching literacy, cooking, playing games, netball, tennis, dance, painting – made an advance to the COP, Borough Councils, around 2013, the then Mayor loved the idea, said he’d put it in the hands of someone who would help to implement it but nothing came of it. Tried to sell it to present Borough council who also love it

*1:12 I would have liked to see a secondary school in San Fernando that will cater for all the black children who get good marks in Common Entrance who don’t get into the best schools. It’s easier for a child from Laventille to get into St. Mary’s or Bishops than it is for a child who lives in Pleasantville or Cocoyea Village to get into St. Joseph’s Convent or Presentation College, and something is wrong.

These are things I have not done and it all ties up with the young people, who are breaking my heart

Anstey Memorial Girls’ Anglican School on Drayton St in San Fernando

five former company members have gone on to create and run successful dance establishments: COBA of Toronto, Canada; Nulook Dance Company, Orlando, Florida USA; Alpha Theatre Dance Company of San Fernando, Trinidad; Beverly Hinds Dance Company of San Fernando, Trinidad; and Elements Dance Company of Fyzabad, Trinidad; while four of our alumni continue to make a significant contribution on the international stage: Wilfred Mark in San Francisco; and Antonio Ferraz, Richard Lessy and Arlene Wilkes, who have been performing and teaching in Norway for over twenty years.

Kirton is an Associate of London College of Preceptors; holds a Physical Education Teacher’s Certificate from Chelsea College of PE, Sussex and a Bachelor of Education, Upper Second Class Honours from the University of Sussex. In addition to teaching, she has been employed as an acting physical education officer for St George & Caroni 1968 -1973; physical education lecturer at Corinth Teachers’ College (1974-1979 and 1983-1987); and acting physical education officer for Victoria, St Patrick (1981-1983). She was assigned to the Curriculum (Dance) Division of the Ministry of Education as a Teacher II from 1987-1988 and has, since 1962, conducted and /or assisted at several in-service courses in physical education and dance on behalf of the Ministry of Education.

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